11 April 2012

The Lockdown on Lending E-Books

My mother, three sisters, and I have been swapping books for years. By the time one of our books falls into the final person's hands, it has been well-loved. Now that we have e-readers, it is difficult—and at times impossible—to lend our favorite books.

According to Amazon.com: Not all books are lendable -- it is up to the publisher or rights holder to determine which titles are eligible for lending.

If an e-book is "lendable," you will see this on the purchase page (link here):
If an e-book is NOT lending enabled, there will be nothing that reads, "Lending: Not Enabled." There will be no lending line at all. (Example here.)

I recently purchased two e-books that I thought were lendable. I didn't see any indication on the purchase page stating otherwise, so I bought them. Once I accessed the books through the Manage Your Kindle link, I discovered I was unable to lend them. To find out why, I searched "lending e-books" in the help center for Amazon.com. I located the above information, plus rules on e-books that are lendable—which I am happy to abide by—but the lending policy is not forthright, and as a customer, I feel deceived. If an e-book isn't lending enabled, why not say so upfront? Even so, if the lending status were written in bold print beside the purchase price, I still think the lockdown on lending e-books is unreasonable. Here's why:

1. Did I buy the book or not? If I bought the book, I should be able to do with it what I please. If I want to lend it, I should be able to do so. I can lend a hard copy, so why not an e-book?

2. Why do some e-books cost more than the paperback copy? I appreciate the ease of buying an e-book with one click and having it sent to my Kindle within seconds, but if I'm restricted from lending it, why would I buy the electronic copy, when for a dollar less I can have—and lend—the paperback? (Example here.)

3. I am a reader who falls in love with a book and blabs about it to anyone who will listen. I shove my copy at a friend and say, "Go. Read. NOW!" Gushing about a book is part of the joy of reading. It's disappointing that I can't do this with many of the e-books I've purchased. You may be thinking, "But the author won't profit unless the people you gush to BUY the book." I agree. Initially, the author may not profit. But if the borrower falls in love with the writer's style, they are likely to purchase previous and future books written by the author, or they may purchase a copy of the book they borrowed (like I frequently do).

If I buy an e-book I cannot lend, do I truly own it? Am I paying for the privilege to borrow the book from the publisher, or do I "own" the copy I purchased?

With Pottermore selling Harry Potter e-books in a format that isn't encrypted (article here), people can access their e-books with a freedom they've never had before. Experts anticipate this will prompt a shift in how the industry formats e-books, particularly in how dominating e-book distributors such as Amazon offer formats, but it still remains to be seen if publishers will lift their lock on restricted e-books and allow customers to lend them.

Am I alone in this frustration? Am I the only reader who believes if I purchase a book, I should be able to do with it what I please, no matter the format?

(Acknowledgments: Thank you to the authors and publishers who permit their books to be lent and borrowed. This reader appreciates you!)


UPDATE:
Because many of you haven't taken the time to click on the links provided and you have piracy concerns, here is the rest of the information on lending e-books through Kindle. I have loaned books, and yes, they did disappear from my Kindle for 14 days. I could no longer read them until the person I lent it to had it for that time period. I have no issue with this. My issue is with disallowing me to lend the book AT ALL.

"Eligible Kindle books can be loaned once for a period of 14 days. The borrower does not need to own a Kindle -- Kindle books can also be read using our free Kindle reading applications for PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, BlackBerry, and Android devices. Not all books are lendable -- it is up to the publisher or rights holder to determine which titles are eligible for lending. The lender will not be able to read the book during the loan period."

80 comments:

Brinda said...

I know that my books are lendable on Kindle and Nook. I've lent books to my sister because that's what we do. We lend books to each other. I haven't come across one that can't be lent.

Christa Desir said...

This is really interesting. It has to do with something called "digital rights management" and is actually more to protect authors. Because you have only ONE paperback to lend out, but with an ebook, you can lend it to 100's of people at the same time. So authors want people to "buy" their books, not just have one person read it and then it gets sent out to everyone they know.

That being said, from an author's POV, I would rather have people "read" my book than not and if disabling DRM makes that happen, then huzzah! The romance industry has allowed for lending on most of their books for several years now, but the books are generally cheaper, etc.

I get what you're saying, I think they just need to figure out a way to balance lending against possible piracy.

L.G.Smith said...

This situation recently came up for me as well. I'm reading a great book and wanted to share it with someone, but realized to do so I'd have to loan them my e-reader too. It does sort of take an element of joy out of the process.

Suzi said...

I hadn't even thought of this, but I don't have an e-reader yet. I guess the e-readers will have to go through the same thing as the music industry.

Maybe my thoughts would change once I become published, but right now I agree with you. I've shared so many books with others over the years.

E. Arroyo said...

I agree, however, it makes sense to guard against piracy. I don't know how the library does it, but those things self destruct after 21 days. =) Something to think about.

Cristina said...

I see the appeal of e-readers, I used to have one and loved the convenience.. but it broke and now... all those books that I had bought... well, yes I can transfer them to my computer.. but guess what? now I wish I had bought the actual books.

I won't be going back to an e-reader until they stop making books ;)

Kyra Lennon said...

I wasn't aware any e-books were lendable, so it's good to know that it is a possibility!

I don't get why some e-books cost more than print books, though. That is very weird to me!

Jack said...

You are not alone. Once paid, you should be able to do what you wish. Only fair.

Richard said...

I agree with you, Emily. You buy it, you own it. But comparing digital books to paper books is difficult. They're different mediums and need different rules, I guess. How it all plays out is yet to be seen.

elizabeth seckman said...

I agree with Christa. It's the mass lending that will hurt writers. If they could make a way that you can pass your copy along so that it leaves your kindle then goes to another then no problem. If one person can buy a book and 100 people get it, writers would be in trouble financially. Especially considering most writers don't make a livable wage already.

JoLynne Lyon said...

I agree that a lot of issues have yet to be worked out. I still miss the days of browsing a real bookshelf and seeing the pretty covers in a row. But one positive note for me is that on accounts I share with my husband, he has access to everything I buy via his iPhone (I've only used iBooks and Amazon). In that way it has facilitated sharing and it's been fun to read and discuss things with him.

Tobi Summers said...

Oh, you are most definitely not a lone. I wouldn't mind if, when I lent an ebook, it disappeared from my Nook or was somehow inaccessible until it was given back. If I lent a paperback, I wouldn't be able to use it. But the fact that I can't lend it at all is what sends me searching for another version of it. I'll buy the book for myself. I'm not buying a copy to give to each friend too.

As a writer, I do understand that piracy is a major concern, and perhaps I'll feel differently once I'm published. But right now it's just frustrating.

Tasha Seegmiller said...

I can see both sides of this issue. I think it would be amazing if we could lend the book, with a two week time frame, and then it left their ereader and came back to mine. Not sure how to make that work but that is the idea I would like to see happen...

Brinda said...

I have to jump in and comment. The Kindle lending does limit to the ONE copy that you lend and is NOT available on your own reader while your friend has it (14 days). That is great to me. It automatically returns to your reader at expiration on the friend's. Also, my library ebooks that I check out from their downloadable library does the same thing. They are limited in what they have to loan and it automatically disappears at end of checkout period.

Brinda said...

In the comment above, the library I am referencing has nothing to do with Amazon. I am referring to my local library. :)

Emily R. King said...

Brinda, thank you! I'm glad those rules protect the writer. I just wish the big publishers would see that they are shooting themselves in the foot by NOT allowing people to lend at all. Seriously. I have a list of 25 TBR books, and 90% of them aren't lendable! Why would I buy them as e-books? :)

Suze said...

"But the author won't profit unless the people you gush to BUY the book."

Like you, I think this is drastically oversimplifying the situation -- isolating one variable and then magnifying it. Nothing but good can come out of the initial sharing of a quality product. If sharing a copy ends in no sales, it'll be not because of the sharing but because of the impression made (or not) by the material. (That was a lot of nots.)

Great topic for a post, Em.

elizabeth seckman said...

(Can you tell I've never tried to lend a book?)
So, what Emily and Brinda says convinces me...Kindle has it figured out. Not allowing people to share an ebook like a hard copy is totally unfair.
And as a writer, lending is good. Mass production; not good. But that's evidently not the issue. Thanks for the education ladies!

welcome to my world of poetry said...

Not having a Kindle I can't really comment, but if copyright is involved then that's a different matter,

Yvonne.

Katherine Roberts said...

As an author, I allow lending on all my ebooks I've published independently. If it helps spread the word about a book, then good! But there is a big difference between being able to lend a book to a friend (as amazon allows under DRM) and piracy (where people copy the book 100's of times to give to others)... piracy is stealing!

I also like to keep my independent prices reasonable, since I think an ebook should cost less than a paperback. But I have have no control over the ebooks produced by my publishers. They are pricing their ebooks high at the moment because they are afraid the ebook will "compete" with the paper version, which is crazy really. I have a new title out in hardcover at the moment with no ebook at all until September, when I expect the publisher will price it the same as the paperback... and that's a bit frustrating!

Emily R. King said...

Jack, I'm glad I'm not alone. :)

Richard, I realize they're different. What I don't understand is why they can determine what I do with the "product" after I buy it. Is it ever really mine?

Suze, I agree. Sharing books is so much fun!

Katherine, I am not condoning piracy. I agree with your frustration on pricing. What I don't agree with is treating all customers like they're going to copy and sell the book they PAID FOR. All I want to do is lend it to one person at a time. That's all. Is that too much to ask, or have I been "shot in the flock" again?

Cassie Mae said...

I don't have much to say after reading all the comments on this. But I did want to let you know I came by and read it and I ditto everything you said :D

Ahem, if you want to lend me some ebooks (like if it's a lendable book) We should totally do so!

Morgan said...

I love sharing ebooks. And ebooks should TOTALLY be less than a physical book. Gah. It is frustrating. Great post, Em.

Michael Offutt, Tebow Cult Initiate said...

Nathan Bransford has blogged about ebook cost vs. paperback and done the napkin math. Publishers are trying to keep ebooks from devaluing the brick and mortar store in which they depend and have a vast interest in "Barnes and Noble". I bought a B&N Nook to help support them with my ebooks. But yes, you are correct...some are lendable and others are not. Ah well. I prefer the portability of my books on a reading device. Real books are extremely heavy.

Emily R. King said...

Michael, I understand the higher cost of e-books in general. I don't mind paying for the convenience of downloading a book onto my Kindle. What I'm not okay with is the lack of information about the e-book's lending status on the purchase page. If it's not lendable, why not say so upfront? If I had known the books I purchased weren't lendable, I would have bought the print copies. I don't like the publisher telling me what I can and can't do with a book I "own."

Ruth Josse said...

My SIL and I discussed this over spring break. We feel the same way, that if we own it we should be able to lend it. We are, after all, spreading the word! Nothing but good can come from that. It is frustrating to read a good book in e-format and tell someone they should read it but they'll have to go buy it because you can't lend it to them. Because for the most part they probably won't.

Johanna Garth said...

I had this happen too recently and I was SO annoyed. I agree, suddenly it feels like I don't own the book.

I made my friend take my Kindle as a way around it!

Cortney Pearson said...

I agree--we pay the money for them, we should be able to lend them out!

Melissa Lemon said...

I've been wondering about that. I haven't read many e-books and don't own a Kindle or Nook yet. I agree that if you buy something you should be able to lend it out. I can't imagine trying to regulate something like that, what a nightmare!

Daisy Carter said...

I haven't delved into e-books yet. I'm too in love with paper. But I see both sides of the coin on this one. If I buy something, I should be allowed to do with it what I choose. However, as a writer who hopes to one day make a living writing, I can see why it might be beneficial to publishers/authors to not allow lending. I'm torn. All that to say, thanks for posting this; it's given me something to consider.

Jaime Morrow said...

This is something that frustrates the heck out of me too. My husband and I recently switched over from Kobo to Kindle because the selection is just so much better for the Kindle. I was appalled, however, at the cost of Kindle e-books. And I thought Kobo was bad! There is zero reason whatsoever for them to charge more for an e-book than the actual hard copy. Especially when they disallow lending on so many books.

They're going to have to make some changes or e-readers and e-books just aren't going to hold any appeal.

Donna K. Weaver said...

I'm totally with you! I have the same issue as I tend to be the "library" for my office. It's hard not being able to lend some books and the reason I still buy many paper books.

Sheena-kay Graham said...

I think it's up to the publisher but I'm glad when books are lendable.

J. A. Bennett said...

I've known about this for awhile and it frustrates me to no end. I totally agree with you, if I bought the book, I should be able to lend the book. Shatter Me for example. I'm pretty sure anyone who reads that will want to buy the next two books. Why be so restrictive? I really think you hit the nail on the head with this one.

Angela Cothran said...

Just one more reason of buy the hard copy.

No one else in my family has an e-reader so if I find a book I love I usually just buy it.

And if an e-book is more that 3.99 I would rather buy the hard back.

I feel like they make everything so complicated. Aughh!

Melissa Sugar said...

This is an interesting topic, Emily and one that up until now, I had not given any thought to. I have borrowed e-books on my kindle. It was sort of by accident. I was about to purchase a book and the "you are eligible to borrow this book for fourteen days", popped up. So I took them up on the offer. This option has only popped up a handful of times.

I am with you on this 100% of the way. If I purchase a book, it should belong to me. With ownership rights comes the right to transfer, loan, sell, gift or destroy your property. We have so many new electronic gadgets and the law is unable to keep up with technology. I feel strongly that our ownership rights are being restricted and infringed upon.

I wasn't bothered until now because I was unaware of Amazon (or the author's) guidelines and limitations. I get very aggravated when my rights are trampled on. You have pushed a button for me that is going to consume my focus until I am satisfied.

I know that the simplicity and ease of a one click purchase is hard to pass up, but I don't have a problem waiting a couple of days for the actual physical book.

Keep us updated on any new information that you acquire, please.

Carol Riggs said...

Hear, hear!! I agree that the great thing about buying a REAL book is that it is loanable. You can do whatever you wish with it--because you've bought it! It's not fair that doesn't apply with an ebook. I didn't know about the loan feature on some books. Rah for JK Rowling introducing the concept of free loaning.

Rachel Pudelek said...

I agree. I think this is why I don't buy music online either. Sometimes if I want a song or two, I'll load it to my ipod, but usually I'd rather have the CD. Same with books. I buy the books I love. If I borrow a book from the library and fall in love with it, I'll buy it to loan out to others, to read again, and to just have cause it's amazing and that author should receive the profits of an amazing book.

I have yet to buy an ereader because of this issue. My daughter has one and loves it, but I like to share my books too much.

Emily Moir said...

This is one of the reasons I still prefer hard copies of books. E-books have their advantages,but I'll always be a hard copy girl.

Carrie Butler said...

Oh, I know what you mean! My sister and I used to loan books back and forth all the time. If I liked the book I borrowed, I usually saved up to buy it myself. Why? Because I knew I would be buying the next book from that author and I wanted the set!

Emily R. King said...

Jaime, I agree. I want distributors and publishers to be more forthright about the lendability of an e-book.

Sheena-Kay, yes, and most of the publishers disallowing lending are the Big 6. Now why is that?

Emily, I thought I struck gold with my Kindle Fire, but now I'm not so sure.

Carrie, so true! But if you want the set as e-books, it's going to cost you. And there's no sharing! I even wanted to loan "The Help" to someone, and couldn't. Why would I buy the e-book when I could pick up the trade paperback at WalMart for less cost and be able to lend it? Crazy!

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

I've never lent an eBook before and have no idea if my publisher allows mine to be lendable. As to why some cost more than the print form, I have no idea. Those are the ones I'm not buying though.

Carol Kilgore said...

Emily, this is a timely post, and well thought out. My indie novel will release in July, and I'm having to make these decisions. My book will be lendable, but I'm still debating with myself on the price.

Indie authors decide everything. Those with publishers, large or small, have no control over pricing or DRM (lending ability). So readers need to be aware if they're basing a purchase from a favorite name author who's backed by a publisher, please don't blame the author and not purchase the book if the books are priced higher or are not lendable. Purchase a print copy if you want, but still buy the book you want to read in whatever media you choose.

I'm new to ebooks, as I only got my Kindle Fire around Thanksgiving. But I totally love it because it's so much easier on my eyes and I can read more books in a shorter period of time.

I don't keep many books, but when I come across one I do want to keep, I'll purchase a print copy for my shelf.

Ack! Sorry this went on and on and on.

Tyrean Martinson said...

Interesting - I'm new to my kindle still, and I thought the reason my daughter received some of my books on her iPod and not others was due to a glitch of my own . . . I bet they weren't lendable. However, since we live in the same house, I can hand her my Kindle for a few days and that's no biggie.

I love being able to share books and authors I love, and I definitely go out an buy books by authors that I've discovered through friends.

Jenny S. Morris said...

Wow, um what else could I say. I think you should be able to lend the 1 copy just like if you had a hard copy.

Thanks for all the info.

Freya Morris said...

Interesting post. I heard on the radio that there is a new site which is going to do this! Challenging Amazon!

*goes off the google it*

That took a while: http://www.eblib.com/

They said they are the only ones who are "multi platformers" and are looking into selling just chapters of some books (for academic use) and also looking into renting (if not already)!

ilima said...

I've yet to do the ebook thing, but I definitely lend my regular books to friends and think we should be able to do the same with ebooks. BUT, if a friend wants to borrow the same book from me over and over, I want to scream and tell them to buy the book already. Support the dang author, and I like to support the industry I'm trying to break in to.

Nas Dean said...

Thanks for this post Emily! Now I'm going to check which books I can lend to my daughter and niece. As I lend them my print copies.

Leigh Covington said...

I am new to the e-reader world so I find this information very helpful. I had no idea about any of this. As a writer I can understand how you might not want all your ebooks lendable only because it would shorten your sales. Although I DO like the idea as a reader! I think it's okay either way, but they NEED to make sure it says one way or another. That should be a requirement! That way you know what you're buying.

Imogen said...

My Mum and I were talking about this the other day, finding it very annoying. Though I wasn't even aware that you could lend certain ebooks. I guess this is just one more reason why I love hardcopy books so much. While I'm happy to read ebooks, I love real books.

Jay Noel said...

It is pretty tricky!

I wish they would tell you upfront if a book is really lending enabled. It is pretty confusing...

Neurotic Workaholic said...

I agree with you that you should be able to lend whatever books you want, whether they're e-books or print copies. It's not like you're making copies of the book itself; you're just loaning it to people who may then like the book so much that they buy their own copy and/or read other books by that author. I know because that's happened to me when I've borrowed books.

Botanist said...

I've not dived into the e-book world yet, and never given a thought about all the things I take for granted with "real" books, but this all adds up to more reasons why I'm in no hurry to go there.

Kelley Lynn said...

I agree Emily. I think that all ebooks should be able to be lent since that's what you could do if you had a hard copy. I do agree that you should only be able to lend it to one person at one time because that's all you'd be able to do if you had a hard copy.

Lara Schiffbauer said...

That was one of the reasons my husband and I went Nook. We can share up to five devices, so if my mom was to get a Nook, and she was on our account, we'd all have access. I'm not sure of the access for outside our account, but when I shop the online store, it has "Lend me" across the books that are lendable. Easy to find. With some of the articles I've read about Amazon, I'm getting a little disgusted with their practices.

Samantha said...

Wow I had no idea about any of this. Thanks for sharing and I definitely agree with you.

Rebecca Kiel said...

The e-reader world still feels pretty new to me. But we have a Barnes & Noble connection, I am often apprised of whatever is the hot new technology.

Sarah Pearson said...

If 'some' books are lendable, then I don't see why they can't all be.

Emily R. King said...

Carol, whatever you choose, be aware that the buyer will assume they have full ownership rights of your book when they do not.

Freya, thanks for the link!

Ilima, I agree. I'll only lend a book once. Then I tell people to buy their own.

Imogen, I love real books too, more so after this discovery.

Botanist, I'm certainly rethinking they're usefulness.

Lara, Barnes and Noble's business practices are in line with what the consumer needs to know. Amazon's are deceptive, and I don't like it.

Samantha, yep. A heads up!

Shelley Sly said...

I can understand your frustration. I don't have an e-reader, so I haven't experienced that yet, but I'm with you.

The Hopeful Romantic said...

The why do e-books cost more than the physical book perplexes me also. I love my kindle but i refuse to pay more than a physical copy for something that doesn't offer the additional enjoyable aspects such as smell and feel.

cherie said...

I am archaic, and therefore, I do not own an e-reader (don't even have an iPad). I love hard copy books. I do have Kindle on my PC and iPhone, but I found (after reading a few e-books) that I can't do it very often (iPhone screen is too small, for instance, and I really don' lug my laptop around just so I can read the books in my Kindle). So I'm still old school.

Mark Noce said...

You raise some great points. The only way things like this will change are if people make enough noise int he blog-o-sphere and it results in different trends in customers. Once the sales change, the companies will change.

Juliana L. Brandt said...

Wow, this is fascinating. I don't have a Kindle but I know, if I did, lending would be absolutely important.

Melissa said...

You brought up some interesting points I hadn't considered. One of the reasons I (usually) refuse to pay as much for an e-book as a hardback is just that--I feel like I don't really own the book. I can't lend it or pass it down to family. I do like the fact that with e-books there isn't second hand selling--the author is supported with each sale--but that's also an argument for keeping the prices low, IMHO. In any case, these are good questions. I'd like some answers, too.

Peaches Ledwidge said...

I wanted to shared a book I was reading with my partner and it was frustrating that I couldn't.

However, since most e-books are 99 cents, I think it's okay. for the more expensive ones, the buyer should be allowed to share.

But I'm a bit biased because I buy second hand books for fifty cents and a dollar.

Coleen Patrick said...

Great topic Emily. I love lending my books out. I find myself telling my sister or someone else about a book and then get frustrated to realize I can't lend it to them. So far only one out of 2 dozen books I've purchased for my kindle have had lending. When I purchase a book I spend several minutes waffling over whether or not I should get the hard copy or not--simply because of this lending issue. I agree with you--if I buy a book I should be able to do whatever I want with it.

Becky Wallace said...

Great post! And yes, I think we should be able to loan our e-books. It drives me crazy that I can't!!

Lynda R Young said...

I won't buy any ebook that costs more than the print version. It's just wrong. I guess the popularity of ebooks has exploded in the last couple of years so standardizations are still being sorted. As for lending, yeah, they should be clear whether or not a book is lendable.

Chantele Sedgwick said...

This was such a great post, Emily. I totally agree with you about wanting to lend books, but can't. My sister and I lend books to each other and I hate it when I find out I can't lend one. Publishers need to read this post! :)

Stephsco said...

Nathan Bransford (former agent and middle grade writer) had a post on why ebooks are sometimes priced higher than print copies, I dug it up here: blog link
It is a pretty silly song and dance the industry is doing to keep the cash rolling in.

I think publishers, if they're savvy, have the chance to learn from the mistakes of the music industry by working WITH customers who want to buy digital rather than to highly restrict. The more they restrict, the more likely to lose money bc people will pirate the material. The easier access - and lending capability, cheaper prices, people are more apt to buy conventionally and not seek out illegal distribution. All the proof is in the history of music downloading.

Emily R. King said...

Cherie, I'm returning to old school, and I won't be buying my books from Amazon.

Marc, well said!

Juliana, I didn't know either. I wish I did!

Melissa, the prices aren't a concern until they start telling me that I'm paying more for an e-book and then restricting my rights as a reader!

Peaches, but I want the same rights to a .99 cent book as a $9.99 book!

Becky, ditto!

Stephsco, I've seen his article. I'm not disputing the cost of e-books. I understand the breakdown, what I don't understand is why I have less rights to an e-book than a hard copy.

I agree that publishers need to be careful how they regulate, but books are not the same as music. You can't charge everyone in the room for listening to a piece of downloaded music. You can charge one person for a book and no one else can read it without the hardware the book was downloaded to. Books are easier to regulate, so I hope they figure out a system soon and give e-book readers more rights to the property they "own."

Stephsco said...

Oh, I totally agree on the rights of sharing an ebook. If you bought it you should be able to lend that one copy to your friend. I was annoyed about that too when I got my Nook; I thought all purchased books I could share with my mom who also has a Nook. GRRR.

I saw Nathan Bransford just wrote another blog about the lawsuit against publishing companies fixing ebook pricing. Interesting developements! link

Emily R. King said...

Stephsco, Grrr is right! I saw Nathan's article. Very interesting indeed. Change is afoot! :)

Karen Peterson said...

Part of the reason I picked Nook over Kindle was the lending feature. And then I discovered that not all books are lendable, and the ones that are can only be lent ONCE.

It's not right. If I buy a digital copy, I should own that book and do with it as I see fit. I think I should be able to "give" that book to other people, too. Remove it from my library and give it to someone else. Why not?

Susan Kane said...

That is only one of the things that frustrate me about e-books.

Leslie Rose said...

I've been wondering about the whole "lending factor," but haven't dipped a toe yet. Thanks for the clear, albeit frustrating, clarification.

Emily R. King said...

Susan, me too!

Leslie, frustrating is right. :)

jaybird said...

I am not a fan of E-books. Mostly because E-books are spineless. But I realize this is the way things are going, and I better get myself used to it. Although it is nice to know that you can lend them out so thanks for this Emily. Great post!

Cindeerella said...

I just ran across your blog while doing a search trying to figure out why I cannot lend a recently purchased book to a friend of mine for her to skim through and decide if she wants to purchase it for herself. I was completely shocked to find out that some books cannot be loaned out. I agree - why would I buy a digital book that I cannot lend to a friend or family member when I can pay less for a paperback and easily hand it over to them? I do understand the need to make money and protect their rights, but this whole thing has me thinking I won't be buying anymore digital books that cannot be loaned out. This was a pretty disappointing discovery.

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